Best in Energy – 20 September 2022

Germany’s auto sector emissions remain high

China boosts imports of coal from Russia

EU/Africa tensions over gas investment ($FT)

La Niña to boost winter heating in Japan ($BBG)

U.S. shale producers hit drilling limits ($WSJ)

U.S. central bank refocuses on inflation ($WSJ)

Stranded asset story and the energy crisis ($FT)

Renewables and domestic energy security ($FT)

California relies on nuclear for 10% of electricity

United States is shifting policy on Taiwan ($BBG)

Coal boom leads to expansion of marginal mines

U.S. TREASURY securities with ten year maturity are yielding 3.53%, the highest since 2010, as traders anticipate the central bank will have to keep interest rates higher for longer to bring down inflation. Yields are rising at the fastest year-over-year rate since 1999. The increase is testing the downward trend in place since the mid-1980s. If the increase is sustained it will force a widespread re-pricing of most other assets:

HEDGE FUNDS and other money managers made few changes to their positions in the six most important petroleum futures and options contracts in the week to September 13. There were total net purchases of +4 million barrels with buying in NYMEX and ICE WTI (+10 million) and Brent (+3 million) but sales of U.S. gasoline (-5 million), U.S. diesel (-3 million) and European gas oil (-1 million):

IF YOU would like to receive best in energy and my research notes every day, you can add your email to the circulation list here: https://eepurl.com/dxTcl1

Best in Energy – 27 May 2022

White House articulates strategy towards China

U.K. announces windfall tax on oil and gas firms

Europe protects households from energy prices

EU runs into problems negotiating Russia oil ban

Offshore drilling experiences cyclical recovery

U.S. hot economy has unwanted side effects ($FT)

Thailand/Vietnam explore rice cartel ($BBG)

Space-based solar power – how realistic is it?

BRENT’s six-month calendar spread is moving into an increasingly steep backwardation again as traders anticipate a growing shortage of crude. High margins for diesel and gasoline are encouraging refineries to maximise crude processing which is intensifying the downward pressure on already-depleted crude inventories:

U.K. DIESEL and gasoline inventories depleted further in March as late-cycle tightness was intensified by the impact of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and some panic-buying by consumers and road haulage firms. Diesel/gas oil stocks were at the lowest seasonal level since 2014 and before that 2006:

SIGN UP to receive best in energy and my research notes every day by adding your email to the circulation list here: https://eepurl.com/dxTcl1

Best in Energy – 23 May 2022

U.S. president ends strategic ambiguity on Taiwan

India cuts fuel taxes and boosts subsidies

Russia ends gas deliveries to Finland on pay dispute

Global refiners in dilemma whether to boost capacity

Electricity supplies are stretched worldwide ($BBG)

Saudi Arabia reiterates commitment to OPEC+ ($FT)

Fuel tax cuts are poor response to high prices ($BBG)

BRENT’s six-month calendar spread has increased to a backwardation of more than $13 per barrel, up from just $3 in early April, as traders anticipate planned EU sanctions on Russia’s petroleum exports will intensify the global shortage of crude oil and refined products:

U.S. RIG COUNT rose by +14 to 728 last week, with the addition of +13 rigs targeting oil-rich rock formations and +1 rig targeting predominantly gas-rich rock. The number of rigs drilling for oil has risen by +404 from its cyclical low in August 2020 but is still -107 below the pre-pandemic level:

SIGN UP to receive a free daily digest of best in energy news plus my research notes every day via email by adding your email to the circulation here: https://eepurl.com/dxTcl1

Best in Energy – 11 April 2022

EU’s Russia coal ban upends market ($BBG)

U.S. SPR sales and impact on oil prices

Nigeria power grid collapses for second time

Germany expects “brief spike” in coal costs

Germany to help firms hit by sanctions ($FT)

EU divided on Russia energy embargo ($FT)

EU divided on Russia oil import ban ($WSJ)

Biomass supplies hit by Russia conflict ($FT)

U.S. transport firms raise fuel surcharges ($WSJ)

Japan orders gas companies to boost inventories

EU/Japan competition for energy imports ($FT)

China’s grain supply threatened by covid ($BBG)

U.S. nuclear generation fell in 2020 and 2021

China accelerates nuclear armament ($WSJ)

U.S. OIL AND GAS producers added +16 new rigs last week with increases in both oil (+13) and gas (+3). The total number of active rigs climbed to 689, up from a cyclical low of 244 in August 2020 but below the pre-pandemic level of 793 in early March 2020:

U.S. NET GAS EXPORTS averaged 332 billion cubic feet per month in the three months from November to January compared with 294 billion in the same period a year earlier, as a result of the growth in liquefaction capacity and strong demand from Europe and Asia:

To receive best in energy and my research notes via email every day, you can add your email to the circulation list here: https://eepurl.com/dxTcl1